OCC Warning of False Communication

November 6, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C. - On November 5, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) issued a warning regarding a ficticious correspondence. The communication is being delivered by e-mail, fax and physical letters. It presents itself as issued by the OCC claiming that the OCC is involved in holding funds for the benefit of the person receiving the communication. It is false. The OCC does not participate in the transfer of funds for, or on behalf of, individuals, business enterprises, or governmental entities.

Currently the communication indicates that the funds are being held by the Halifax Bank, London, England and the the recipient will be required to pay the mandatory express service charge to have the funds released. It then goes on to try to gather confidential information from the recipient so the funds can be released. The communication also may contain forged signatures of former OCC officials and fake OCC e-mail addresses.

If you or anyone you know receives this communication, it is false and should not be responded to in anyway. The correspondence can be ignored or if you have any questions, the OCC recommends, at a minimum, the following:

  • Contact the OCC directly to verify the legitimacy of the proposal (1) via e-mail at occalertresponses@occ.treas.gov; (2) by mail to the OCC's Special Supervision Division, 250 E St. SW, Mail Stop 2-7, Washington, DC 20219; (3) via fax to (202) 874-5214; or (4) by calling the Special Supervision Division at (202) 874-4450.
  • Contact state or local law enforcement.
  • File a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov if the proposal appears to be fraudulent and was received via e-mail or the Internet.
  • File a complaint with the U.S. Postal Inspection Service by telephone at (888) 877-7644; by mail at U.S. Postal Inspection Service, 222 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 1250, Chicago, IL 60606-6100; or via the online complaint form at https://postalinspectors.uspis.gov/forms/MailFraudComplaint.aspx, if the proposal appears to be fraudulent and was delivered through the U.S. Postal Service.